This permanent worship, in spirit and in truth, given to the Father places Christ in a double relation of love for the Father and of mercy for the world. Jesus stands at the intersection, at the crossroads of the conflict and the reconciliation of the world with the Father. It is in the prayer of Christ, in His permanent and perfect worship, that the relations of the world and God are unveiled in their hidden truth, reaching a degree of extreme tension. Far from being absent from the prayer of Christ, the world is intensely present in it, in two ways: a) because Christ summarizes in Himself humankind, recapitulates it, takes up the burden of its sin, presents Himself to the Father by carrying upon his shoulders this load of iniquity and sin, “the One who knew no sin, was made sin for us” (2 Cor 5:21;  see Gal 3:13); and b) because this world and this humanity are the object of the supplication of the Savior, of His heavenly intercession. (157-158) …

In the Spirit, the Church evokes the Savior’s entire work of redemption, but also, inversely, the cosmos, creation, all of humanity projected in Christ, recapitulated, and restored in Him. Here we discover the concept of “extensive Christology.” This means that the redeeming Pascha that the Church memorializes is the heart of the world’s history, its most real and decisive destiny. The Church gives thanks to the Father for Jesus and remembers Him. In the power of the Spirit, this  memorial of the Church is creative: it transcends space and time, makes us contemporaries of the Jesus of history, of the creative Logos, of the crucified Christ, exalted at the right hand of the Father; contemporaries, that is, of the One who is, who was, and who is to come. The tribulations of Christians behind all the iron curtains of the world sensitize us more to the ecclesial and cosmic memorial of the Cross and Passion of the One who recapitulates and sublimates in Himself all human suffering, who wipes away every tear. …

It is necessary to widen the memorial of Christ to a remembrance of the saints, the deceased, the suffering, the living, of all the members of the Body of Christ. It is necessary, finally, that the memorial of the divine Christ, historic and whole, culminates in the eucharistic communion which introduces us at the same time to an encounter with the risen Christ who becomes more intimate, more inward than our inmost self. But eucharistic communion also means life in common, a sharing with all the members of the Body of Christ, the saints, the deceased, the living; the eucharistic communion therefore actualizes the real, sacramental presence of the entire Church, in the totality and the fullness of her faith, her tradition, and her holiness. All this is immersed in the eucharistic Body and Blood we consume and which consume us, which we assimilate and which assimilate us. (184-185)

Boris Bobrinskoy, The Mystery of the Trinity: Trinitarian Experience and Vision in the Biblical and Patristic Tradition (Crestwood, N.Y.: St Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1999).

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